Sorbent Products – Choosing the Right Sorbent Products For Workplace Safety

Spills are a fact of life in any industrial-type workplace. And so absorbent products like pads and rolls are an important staple in many work places. But which ones are the best ones to get? Read on and discover right sorbent products for workplace safety.

Say you’ve just finished work, you’ve got oil and grease all over your hands, and you need to wipe your hands. Without sorbent products you might be wiping your hands on concrete, the grass, or, worse — your clothes!

Of course, most businesses – especially mechanical repair shops and manufacturing warehouses- spend a lot of money on absorbent products and for good reason. And they also put some thought into getting just the right kinds.

Absorbents go a lot further than just a piece of rag or a scrap of paper towel, these days. There are specific products out there that are designed to soak up oil, anti static pads and even hazmat pads for unknown substances or substances that are known to be hazardous.

But let’s say you’re not looking for anything special, just plain absorbent pads or rolls of paper that can do the trick for a variety of cleanups around the workplace. You can have the choice of general purpose absorbents or economy absorbents in both rolls and pads.

While the general purpose ones have the benefit of being lint-free fabric, the economy ones will still absorb hydrocarbons like oil, gasoline, fuel, diesel and lubricating oils. The economy pads and rolls also have the benefit of being available for the “right price.” which makes them very popular.

But don’t overlook the general purpose versions. In addition to being made out of better material, the general purpose pads and rolls handle a broader range of fluids and oils at cleanup time. In fact, the general purpose pads will clean up all the fluids and oils the economy ones do, plus coolants, cutting fluids, hydraulic fluids, vegetable oil, acetone, turpentine, ether, MEK, hexane, trichloroethylene and more.

If you’re dealing specifically with oil then, that’s no problem either. In fact, there are absorbent pads and rolls that will repel and even float on water and, at the same time, absorb all hydrocarbons.

So now what about all of the hazardous stuff? Things like hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, nitric acid and caustic soda. You need special cleanup materials for these, and the hazmat line of absorbent products is perfect for the job.

For situations that require antistatic cleanup materials, you’ll find that specially treated meltblown polypropylene is perfect for the job. The antistatic pads and rolls will absorb all oils plus any other hydrocarbons, and they also come in a blue bag for quick identification, so they won’t be confused with regular clean up materials.

The latter products are the perfect choice when it comes to absorbing fuels that may become volatile in cold applications, in dry, low humidity areas or in any place where a potential for sparks exists.

General Wholesale – Tips in Finding Children’s Clothes For Your General Wholesale Clothing

When you talk about general wholesale clothing business, it simply means selling different types, kinds, and varieties of clothes to the general public. However, wholesalers do not only sell their clothing products to the general crowd but also to retailers and other entrepreneurs. This type of business ranked as one of the most popular and most engaged business worldwide. Most especially online, millions of entrepreneurs established their clothing business and trying to compete to be a one of the powersellers. One of the main reasons for its popularity is because of its speed in generating an income. Other than that, this type of business never loses potential customers.

Children’s clothing topped as the most purchased clothing among the variety of clothes sold in a general wholesale business. Most customers are able to purchase children’s clothes at very low prices. Even selling the products to a very low price still wholesalers can generate big income because when they purchased these products from their suppliers in bulk and with great discounts in every income.

In this type of business, big companies are not the only one offering wholesale clothing but thousands of suppliers are listed on reliable directories online. Some websites may require a little payment, but there are also other with free listings. But with even among with these suppliers, it is not still easy an easy tasks to find kid’s clothing with very good quality plus good discounts.

For newbies in this kind of business, they need to find an internet site having children’s clothing products with big discounts or at a very low price. These clothing must also have high quality, in perfect condition, and having different sizes, shapes, and styles. Buying these products is in bulk so the more you purchased, the bigger your discounts. Kid’s clothing is considered vintage in nature so customers always search from rack to rack when shopping. Others children’s clothing that are easy to find are vintage inspired clothing which can give a more classic punk look to children. In these kinds of apparels, they will be able to enjoy the style for a long time.

Is the General Aviation Industry Finally on an Upswing?

Over the past three decades, there’s been a steady decline in the number of U.S. pilots. According to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), there were 827,000 active, certificated pilots in 1980. By 2011, that number had dropped to just 617,000. During that same 30-year period, production of single-engine planes dropped from 14,000 per year to fewer than 700.

But for the past three years, AOPA has made understanding this declining trend and reversing it a top priority. AOPA actions include developing a network of flying clubs, and speaking out in Washington to help keep the rising cost and complexity of aviation under control.

Thankfully, 2013 numbers are indicating a positive upswing, based on data from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association’s (GAMA) 2013 General Aviation Statistical Databook & 2014 Industry Outlook.

Here’s a look at what’s been causing the pilot and production decline, and good news from GAMA’s 2013/2014 aviation industry report.

What’s been causing the decline?

According to a Washington Post article posted February 9 titled, “Small aviation businesses say pilot shortage could drive industry into the ground,” there are a variety of factors that have contributed to the decline in pilots and production over the past decades, including rising fuel prices and heightened flying restrictions following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

One reason is that the recent economic downturn has left fewer people with discretionary income. Others place much of the blame on federal regulators, whom they accuse of making it too difficult for pilots to obtain and renew their licenses, which in turn hurts small aviation businesses and the aviation industry as a whole.

Many commercial pilots come from the GA pilot pool, and the global airline industry will need almost a half million new commercial airline pilots over the next 20 years, according to the Boeing Pilot and Technical Market Outlook for 2013-2032.

Good news from GAMA’s 2013/2014 industry report

Here are some positive numbers from GAMA’s annual statistical databook.

Airplane shipments and billings – In 2013, airplane shipments increased by 4.3 percent to 2,256 airplane deliveries, and billings increased 24 percent to $23.4 billion across all airplane types. This is the second-highest industry billing number ever recorded-the industry’s peak billings occurred in 2008 at $24.8 billion.

Business jets – After slowing the past four years, the business jet market stabilized in 2013. There were 678 business jets delivered in 2013, up from 672 in 2012. Several new models and increasing demand helped stabilize the market and increase deliveries.

North American market share rose to 52.4 percent from 49.7 percent in 2012. Europe’s market share declined, however, from 20.8 percent in 2012 to 15.6 percent in 2013. Customer deliveries included 11.9 percent to customers in the Asia-Pacific region, 11.1 percent to Latin America, and 9.0 percent to the Middle East and Africa.

Turboprops – Turbo-propeller plane shipments also grew in 2013, increasing to 645 shipments from 584 shipments in 2012, a 10.4 percent increase. Shipments of agricultural turboprops, which GAMA began tracking in 2011, remained strong. Traditional single- and twin-engine turboprop shipments provided year-over-year increases in unit deliveries. North American customers took 57.1 percent of turboprop airplane deliveries in 2013, up from 48.6 percent in 2012. The Asia Pacific region took the second-largest market share at 14 percent, followed by Latin American at 13.2 percent. European customers took delivery of 10.5 percent, and the Middle East and Africa accounted for 5.3 percent.

Turbine helicopters – The turbine helicopter segment provided positive delivery performance in 2013 based on analysis of equivalent companies from 2012. GAMA identified 782 turbine helicopter shipments in 2013, which is an increase of 9.2 percent compared to the prior year for the same reporting companies. In this year’s databook, GAMA has expanded the available historical data about helicopter shipments with select information from 1999 through 2013.

Piston airplane and helicopter deliveries – Feedback from airplane and helicopter manufacturers indicates that global demand from flight schools is contributing to year-over-year growth. Piston airplane deliveries totaled 933 shipments in 2013, up from 908 shipments in 2012, a 2.8 percent increase. North America ordered 52.8 percent of piston engine airplanes, Europe 17.2 percent, followed by the Asia-Pacific region at 15.1 percent, Latin America at 10 percent, and the Middle East and Africa at 5 percent of shipments. In 2013, the general aviation industry delivered 335 piston-powered helicopters, which was a slight increase from the 328 units delivered in 2012.

Turbine operators – According to JETNET, LLC, the fractional fleet of turbine operators fell to 869 aircraft in 2013, decreasing each year since 2008, the year it peaked at 1,094 aircraft. There were 4,365 fractional owners in 2013, which is also down compared to five years ago, when there were 5,179 owners. The worldwide turbine airplane fleet included 33,861 airplanes in 2013 and an additional 19,509 turbine helicopters.

Pilot population falling – The active U.S. pilot population continues to fall. The private pilot population has declined since the early 1980s, when it peaked at 357,479 pilots, and in recent years has lost between 5,000 and 10,000 active pilots each year. There were only 180,214 private pilots at the end of 2013, and a total of 599,086 total active pilots in the U.S. in 2013. One bright spot: 40,621, or 6.78 percent, were female-the highest ratio of female aviators on record.

Signs safety is improving – A welcome decrease: The FAA’s preliminary data about general aviation safety shows there were approximately 216 fatal accidents during the year, a double-digit decline in the number of fatal general aviation accidents during 2013. While data is preliminary, the FAA’s goal of reducing the GA fatal accident rate to one fatal accident per 100,000 hours flown may be possible to achieve by 2018.

GAMA also includes GA safety data developed by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) for 2006 through 2012. EASA statistics from 2012 also show a decline in the total number of accidents and the number of fatal accidents.

References:

http://www.aopa.org/Community-and-Events/Center-to-Advance-the-Pilot-Community

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/on-small-business/small-aviation-businesses-say-pilot-shortage-could-drive-industry-into-the-ground/2014/02/08/2422cadc-8f5c-11e3-b46a-5a3d0d2130da_story.html

Telecom Product Lifecycle – End of Maintenance – End of Support – End of Life

Network planning teams or Engineering Teams in Telecom companies are responsible for Planning and Designing the Networks. It is their job to select new products or upgrade existing deployed equipment in the Network. Telecom equipment is generally very expensive and the planning engineers must be very careful when selecting a product to meet their needs. One major aspect which engineers generally forget or not totally aware of is the Product Life-cycle, and it has also been observed that Vendors also do not inform customers or operators about the product life cycle if not asked specifically.

Point to note is that generally all Telecom products have a life cycle. A product has certain life and it goes through certain upgrade paths before it is declared “End of Life” or out of support. So when you are selecting any product for the Telecom Network make sure the product should at least have 5 to 10 years of life before its vendor discontinues its support. It’s because of the huge cost involved in buying the products. Telecom business plans are majorly impacted by the cost of the equipment used in the Network. So if the planning teams mistakenly select a product which is going to be end of life soon, then of course the company will have to replace the product soon, which will definitely affect the overall Business Plan.

Vendors plan upgrade paths in steps to earn more money and do not provide some features at once. You will have to purchase upgrades i.e. software and hardware both in steps, and planning engineers must be fully aware of these steps which are generally available in Product Road Map documents. If vendors do not provide the information then please ask them to provide in detail so that you properly and cost effectively plan your network life cycle.

Generally vendors do not give visibility of the product roadmaps more than 2 to 3 years ahead. You need to insist on getting roadmaps for next 5 to 10 years.

Don’t forget that you will not get any software or hardware support from the vendors when the product has passed End of Support Dates and there are different solutions available to the problem when your equipment is End of Life. You can ask the vendors for:-

* Extended support
* Buy some spare equipment and run the equipment yourself without support, it’s a bit risky
* Buy support from some third party

Anyhow you will have to purchase new products once they have passed End of Life dates and it has major cost impact on the business plans which must be carefully evaluated and planned.