Specifying the Use of Surface Protection Products on Historic Interiors During Construction

Projects involving historic interiors range from the meticulous restoration of a classic movie theatre to renovations of abandoned lofts for new residences. The size of the building, significance of the interiors, and scope of work will determine how best to protect interior finishes during construction work. All work involving historic buildings, however, shares the need to properly plan for and specify appropriate temporary surface protection products. Without such provisions, unnecessary damage can result which will require additional funds and can lead to complete loss of certain interior finishes. Relying on the contractor to protect interiors without specifying such surface protection puts historic material and finishes at unnecessary risk. Protective measures must be specified in the construction specifications for the job. Although general contract language may make reference to “protecting existing construction” and may require that the contractor “restore any damage to its original condition at no additional cost” the general nature of the language affords little protection to existing historic finishes or features. Rather than provide adequate protection, some contractors deliberately elect to repair damage, believing it is cheaper. Therefore the best practice for historic interiors involves specifying protection of all historic architectural features and finishes using temporary surface protection products.

An important difference between protecting historic interior features and finishes and protecting new interior features and finishes during construction is in the timing of the construction schedule. In new work, finishes such as cabinetry and flooring are installed late in the construction schedule, after mechanical and electrical systems and other high impact work are completed, thus not exposing the finishes to major construction operations. In preservation work, however, existing interior finishes are exposed to all the high impact and potentially damaging construction phases of the project. Important architectural features which are easily removed should be stored off site, if possible, to protect them from vandalism, theft and damage during construction. Lighting fixtures, fireplace mantels, and interior doors are typical examples. Access by construction personnel to spaces with significant features and finishes should be restricted, except for their work relating directly to the preservation of such spaces. Spaces with restricted access should be identified by the planning team and indicated in the construction documents in order to allow the contractor to include any associated costs in his price proposal. For spaces such as halls and lobbies, it may not be practicable to limit access, and for all interior spaces, some construction work may be required. In such circumstances, interior finishes must be physically isolated from construction operations by means of protective barriers and coverings such as the Zipwall Systems. Such surfaces are generally limited to flooring, walls up to approximately 6 foot height, and special construction such as staircases. Flooring should be protected from damage caused by abrasion, falling objects and there are a variety of floor protection products available from companies that specialize in surface protection.

Temporary protection during construction can involve covering historic features, such as floors and walls, as well as using temporary doors to control the passage of workers and the inevitable dust and dirt. Prominently located fire extinguishers are mandatory. Where protection from spilled liquids is required, a layer of water resistant surface protection should be used. In projects where electrical systems are being upgraded the use of fire rated protection should be used. Care should be taken in choosing the appropriate floor protection to ensure that moisture from spilled liquids is not trapped against the historic flooring or that newly installed or repaired flooring can breathe. Care should also be taken to avoid coverings such as rosin paper, could potentially stain the historic flooring. Historic stairways, balustrades, balconies, fireplaces, door surrounds, window surrounds, and other components will also need to be protected from construction damage. There are a variety of surface protection products on the market including Swiftwrap handrail protection, Ram Jamb door jamb protection, DoorGuard temporary door protection and others. It makes sense to contact a surface protection expert in order to choose the best temporary protection for the project.

Specifying temporary protection of historic interiors during construction is the responsibility of both the architect and contractor. Most general conditions of a construction contract contain language such as: “The Contractor shall be solely responsible for and have control over construction means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for coordinating all portions of the work. For preservation projects, it is recommended that temporary protection of historic interiors during construction be specified in a separate Division 1 specification section to ensure that required provisions are not overlooked by bidders. By creating a separate section in a price proposal, the bidder will be inclined to treat the “special project procedures” as an added cost rather than a part of the temporary facilities required for any alteration project. The contractor’s project manager can thus anticipate making reasonable expenditures for providing specified temporary surface protection during construction. To ensure the adequacy of temporary protection measures in projects involving a construction manager, temporary protection is often best provided by the construction manager, who normally works for the owner on a cost-plus-fee basis. Temporary surface protection should generally be specified as to the product name, type and company where products are available.

Conditions prior to commencement of construction should be photographically documented by the contractor. For small projects, a videotape survey may also be an effective supplement to existing conditions photographs. The owner may wish to document existing conditions independent of the contractor in order to avoid any future dispute regarding damage caused by construction operations as opposed to pre-existing damage. Temporary protection of historic interiors during construction, an essential component of any preservation project, is largely a construction management issue. A successful protection program is the result of careful pre-planning, thorough project specific specifications, owner vigilance, contract enforcement, and contractor diligence. Cost savings can be realized by minimizing damage to the historic structure in the course of construction work and the proper use of temporary surface protection products.

Recruit Confederate Generals for Your Network Marketing Business!

“I Have a Dream” – Dr. Martin Luther King

“I Had a Dream, I Had an Awesome Dream” – Lionel Richie

“I Had an Awesome Daydream about Confederate Network Marketing” – Nathan BF Gurley

The American Civil War Between the States had ended and the top Confederate Generals were available for introduction to my new network marketing company. With the encouragement of my sponsor I was able to muster up enough moxie to approach them individually via a three way phone call. The leaders of the army were extremely receptive to my new business model and could not wait to get started. As beloved leaders in the military, they had absolutely no problem recruiting thousands of prospects to join our business. After all, it was all for the cause. My visions of never ending circles drawn on a white board were finally coming to fruition.

Suddenly, my wife instructed me to mow the lawn. Daydream over. The true screech of the Rebel Yell escaped me forever yet all is not lost. A singing cowboy rode into town with $9 and a new solution to network marketing.

The days of recruiting prospects are over. The days of elevating ordinary folks to the rank of Confederate General in the 21st Century are upon us. Before that can happen, 4 problems need to be addressed.

Problem #1: People Hate to Sell.

Many people realize the power of network marketing. Back in the day we often saw the circles on boards and flip charts in hotel conference rooms; if we were lucky enough to get a morning slot we might be able to comp an all appetizing continental breakfast. Where I come from, if it don’t have bacon, eggs, and grits, it ain’t breakfast. Anyway, most people hate to sell and you can draw all the circles you want on a chalk board – people hate to sell and that WAS a major problem.

Problem #2: People Push the Products and/or Company.

There are a few network marketing companies that have been in business since the inception of the concept; however most don’t last longer than the duration of the Civil War. The nature of the beast is that any network marketing company that hasn’t been around for numerous years lacks credibility in most peoples’ minds. A company could have the greatest product in the world and the most exciting compensation plan but so what. Most people may like the idea, but they don’t know how to market so in essence you are creating another problem in their lives i.e It’s good, I like the concept, but how am I going to market it. Doubt sets, in bills pile up, prospect drops out and the thing crashes. That WAS a major problem.

Reason #3: Most People Feel They Can’t Do Presentations.

I don’t know about you, but I sure got the jitters when I went to do a flip chart presentation.

Sometimes, the prospect would go so far as to grab the book from me to see what else was in it.

Doing product presentations WAS a major problem for most people.

Reason #4: Many People Feel They are Not Leaders.

Confederate General Lee, Jackson, Forrest & others were obviously great leaders. People like that are few and far between. More than likely most leaders are born and the others are developed. In any case, to be a leader takes passion, commitment to the cause and a holistic view of the desired outcome that needs to be achieved despite any obstacles. We all face obstacles and fail at some point or another, but most of us do not have the faith Confederate General Stonewall Jackson had. People get discouraged and drop out because they can’t visualize themselves in the place they aspire to be. Finding leaders who can direct others to become leaders WAS a major problem in network marketing.

When the Internet was first made available to the masses(15 years ago?) Network Marketers everywhere were thrilled as they would be able to reach more people. Unfortunately, for most, the dreams of success for many were never realized because the aformentioned problems still existed.

Personally, I know these problems to be self-evident because I have experienced them myself many times.

* I hate to sell

* I’ve tried to push a company or a product with no success

* I’m not a natural born learder

What do I do? Give up and allow my daydream of recruiting generals to not materialize?

NO WAY!

What say you Singing Cowboy?…

Introducing the $9 Solution

Seven years into the 21st Century a country music singer figured out how to overcome all the obstacles to success in network marketing by completely eliminating the problems mentioned earlier.

What? Are you kidding? Did Colonel Keith fill you up with too much whiskey and give your horses too much beer?

No, it’s true.

Please allow me to introduce to you Chad Rissenan, The Marketing Cowboy, inventor of the $9 Solution. The system will pole vault you over those hurdles that have been preventing you from being successful in network marketing.

No Selling, No Presenting, No bothering your family.

Follow the $9 Solution and those “circles” will come to fruition. You will develop generals in your organization who can easily teach duplication. Leaders will surface and success will follow with the $9 Solutions.

The system will:

1.) Find Prospects For You

2.) Generate Quick Cash

3.) Do Presentation for You

and much more all for the alarming price of $9.

The $9 Solution works and is revolutionizing network marketing. Try it before everyone else does.

“Get there first with the most” – Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest

Buy General Electric Refrigerators for Quality and Functionality

General Electric is a name that for many is synonymous with high quality fridges. General Electric refrigerators were one of the first brands on the market and they have led the way in creating quality home appliances for over a century. The fact that this is a well respected and trusted company is why many people come back to them when they want to buy with confidence that they will receive a great fridge.

About refrigeration

Until fairly recent times, refrigeration technology didn’t exist. In its earliest days, only commercial premises had refrigerators and it was only 50 or so years ago that refrigerators became common place in the average persons home. With the advent of this technology, the purchasing, preparation and storage of food was transformed and it changed what people were able to buy, when they could buy it and how long it would keep after purchase. Foodstuffs such as milk, meat and vegetables that were not able to be stored for long periods were suddenly able to be kept in the home without perishing quickly.

General Electric’s Long History

General Electric is a company that spans the globe and it has a solid reputation across world. This organisation built its reputation on good quality electronics, which still incorporates household electronics to this day. Lighting and electrical appliances are what gave this company its foundations, and the longevity of the business is a testimony in many people’s eyes to the strength of the company.

Why should you buy General Electric refrigerators?

As one of the leaders in the development of refrigeration, the choice of a GE refrigerator indicates a desire to buy an innovative, advanced product that offers state of the art food storage. If you value the chance to purchase a trusted brand, then this is by far one of the best. General Electric has been an industry leader in the manufacture of household electrical appliances for a very long time. As a consumer, this means you can buy with confidence from them, knowing you they are a manufacturer who have lead the way in this field.

If you desire a product that provides exceptional quality, then there is little doubt that General Electric refrigerators offer that level of quality. The company has taken pride in creating products that back up their reputation. They have established themselves as industry leaders – and they take their role seriously. For the customer, that means buying with confidence that these electrical appliances will live up to the high standard that the company has delivered for the last 136 years.

What Does a Product Manager Do?

The role of a product manager tends to vary heavily depending on product lifecycle and stage of the company. Due to this variability, there is a wide range of day-to-day activities, but ultimately a product manager is still responsible for doing whatever it takes to collaborate with multiple teams and move different conversations towards closure. Many product managers state that the skill of empathy is one of the most important for a product manager as you need to be able to understand everyone’s motives and make sure that you are collaborating and persuading people to support your decisions.

To provide an example of what I do on a daily basis, below is an agenda of a typical day:

8:30AM: Wake up and check major tech blogs (I work as a PM in the gaming industry) and general news to make sure I’m up to date with the competition and market. Check my Google Doc PM Task List and add/edit any items I need to complete for the day. If I have extra time, I’ll try to complete at least 20-30 minutes of any online course I happen to be taking at the time. It’s important for me to be constantly learning a subject I’m not familiar with to make sure I’m personally growing. I try my best to avoid e-mail until I get into the office or else I end up just spending my valuable morning time responding or cleaning up my inbox.

9:30AM: Head into the office and grab some quick breakfast before getting ready for the daily morning standup with my dev team.

10:00AM: Every day, we run a daily 15 minute team standup, which is generally a standard part of the agile development process. In this meeting, we have a dedicated Project Manager who runs each session and asks 3 key questions 1) What did you work on yesterday? 2) What will you be working on today? 3) Are there any problems hindering you from completing your work?

10:15AM-1:00PM: This work chunk is generally divided by e-mails, quick meetings, and KPI updates. One of the first things I do is update all of my KPI dashboards to make sure metrics aren’t out of whack and everything is running smoothly. Right now, I’m on a fairly new product and a lot of my meetings revolve around discussions for new core features that I help to scope out as well as prioritize in our ever growing product roadmap. We’re rushing to do a global launch on the Android platform so it’s imperative that we shift around all features that can wait until later builds.

1:00PM-1:30PM: Grab a quick lunch with co-workers and generally just hang out. I’m fortunate that my co-workers are also really good friends and we all get along really well.

1:30PM-4:00PM: I spend some time sitting with our sales team (in gaming we call them a live-operations team that handles events and sales within our games) to discuss a new admin tool that our sales team wants our dev team to build. I sync up with the engineering manager to briefly discuss technical requirements and then spend some time wireframing (in PPT, we don’t use anything fancy like Balsamiq) the tool and passing it along to the engineering manager who gets the right dev member to start working on the tool. I also spend a lot of time pulling data to run ad-hoc analyses on recent features that went live as well as dig into why our acquisition rate has been slowly dropping recently.

4:00PM-5:30PM: Meet with Product Marketing to get a sense of what our recent yields have been looking like and to decide whether or not we want to start ramping up marketing spend. We’ve been worried about rising CPI (Cost per Install) lately and wanted to test various ad creatives to see if split testing various ads might lead to lower user acquisition costs. Ultimately, we decide we want to hold off ramping marketing spend for awhile until we can isolate the source of lower yields recently (could be product, market, or marketing related).

5:30PM-6:00PM: Drink with the co-workers in the office and hang out for awhile before heading home for the day.

Although the list above is just one sample day in the life of a product manager, there are definitely set responsibilities that a product manager is always trying to find time to do:

Strategy Planning – As a PM, I always keep a tab of short/mid/long term product feature ideas and it’s extremely important to always be thinking about whether or not these ideas make sense given recent market changes or data analyses that you’ve performed.

Project Management – A good PM is very organized with gathering information from various teams and properly summarizing/documenting the most important information to be shared with appropriate stakeholders. For example, I need to maintain a clean product roadmap with estimated completion times and release dates not just for myself, but also to share with product marketing so that they have a heads up to when they should start working on new campaigns or ad creatives.

Data Analysis – Data is crucial to making well-informed product decisions so PMs should be able to understand and hopefully pull the data they need to run analyses. Learning SQL and Excel are a must to run basic data analysis on the job.

User Testing – It’s imperative to find time to sit down or at least speak with your users so that you can understand their problems and get feedback on what you can improve or create.